Wooden statue of St Apollonia and two tormentors, Europe, 1850-1928

Made:
1850-1928 in Europe
maker:
Unknown

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Carved wooden figure group of St. Apollonia, patron Saint of toothache sufferers, with two tormenters, copy of original near Pontivy, France

Many Christians have long believed that the saints are able to plead with God on their behalf and that particular saints can give protection against specific illnesses. St Apollonia was considered a saint, having been martyred around 249 CE. In the Christian tradition, a martyr is someone killed because of their beliefs.

This statue shows the very painful way in which Apollonia was martyred. Her teeth were broken and pulled out one by one using pliers. For this reason, she is revered as the patron saint of toothache and of dentists. This statue is a copy of the original, which is in the Chapelle de la Houssaye in Pontivy, France.

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Details

Category:
Dentistry
Object Number:
A63594
Materials:
complete, oak (wood), paint
type:
statue
taxonomy:
  • visual and verbal communication
  • sculpture
credit:
Treanton

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