Medicinal water from hot spring of Saint Maria Theresa

Made:
1920-1928 in Bagneres de Bigorre
maker:
Unknown

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Group shot of from left to right: Bottle of medicinal water taken from the hot spring of St. Rock, Bagneres de
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Group shot of from left to right: Bottle of medicinal water taken from the hot spring of St. Rock, Bagneres de
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Bottle, glass, containing medicinal water from the hot spring of Saint Maria Theresa at Bagneres de Bigorre, France, collected in 1928

This bottle of medicinal water (on the far right) was collected from the hot spring of Saint Maria Theresa at the spa town of Bagnères de Bigorre in south-west France. Hot springs and mineral waters were popular in a number of ancient cultures – including Greek and Roman. Centuries later, a renewed interest in the healing and medicinal properties of these natural waters reached a peak in the Victorian period with hundreds of sites across Europe packed with visitors coming to ‘take the waters’ in the hope of a cure.

The handwritten label on this bottle gives the date, “17 March 1928”, the temperature of the spring, “32ºC” (90ºF), and indicates that it is to be used for the throat. Once cooled the water was either drunk or applied to the body. The bottle is shown here with three others from the same region of France (A103802, A103805, and A103806).

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Science Museum: Medicine: The Wellcome Galleries

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Details

Category:
Ethnography and Folk Medicine
Object Number:
A103807
Materials:
bottle, glass, clear and stopper, cork
type:
bottle
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • container - receptacle
  • vessel
credit:
Loan, Wellcome Trust

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