Small Syro-Egyptian Islamic magical medical bowl

Made:
1250-1900 in Iran and Egypt

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Small brass magical-medical bowl or poison cup, inscribed with therapeutic blessings and possibly dedicated to the Mamluk Sultan of Egypt al-Malik al-Mu'izz 'Izz al-Dunya wa-al-Din Aybak (1250-1257), unsigned, Syro-Egyptian, 13th century or possibly a later copy. Inscription reads, 'This blessed cup neutralizes all poisons. In it have been gathered proven benefits...It is useful for the bite of serpent and scorpion and fever, for a woman in labour and increasing milk, for [the bite of] a rabid dog, for abdominal pain and colic, for migraine and throbbing pain, for hepatic and splenic fever, for [increasing] strength, for [stopping] haemorrhage, and for all diseases and afflictions. The afflicted person or his agent drinks from it, and then they will be cured, by the help of God.'

Small brass divination bowl, probably from Persia (Iran), 19th century. It is inscribed: 'This blessed cup neutralizes all poisons. In it have been gathered proven benefits .. It is useful for the bite of serpent and scorpion .. for abdominal pain .. for all diseases and afflictions. The afflicted person or his agent drinks from it and then they will be cured, by the help of God'.

Details

Category:
Ethnography and Folk Medicine
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A639330
type:
divination-bowl
taxonomy:
  • divination object