Crookes tube, England, 1874-1900

Made:
1874-1900 in England
Crookes tube, for the study of cathode rays.
      Full view, white perspex background with reflection.

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Crookes tube, for the study of cathode rays. Full view, white perspex background with reflection.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Crookes tube, for the study of cathode rays

During the late 1870s, Sir William Crookes (1832-1919) studied the effects of passing electricity through partially evacuated tubes like this one. Rays emitted from the cathode, which is an aluminium disc in this tube. Crookes was interested in studying the cathode rays. These cathode rays were later shown to be comprised of electrons.

Wilhelm Röntgen discovered X-rays by accident in 1895 while working with a Crookes tubes. He observed they were emitted when the cathode rays struck the glass.

Details

Category:
Laboratory Medicine
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A629130
Materials:
anode, aluminium, cathode, aluminium and tube, glass
type:
x-ray tube
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • x-ray machine