Lower-body negative pressure box, Europe, 1960-1970

Made:
1960-1970 in Europe
maker:
Unknown

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Lower-body negative pressure box, developed by Professor Greenfield in Northern Ireland for work with astronauts, 1960-1970

Originally designed by Professor Greenwood in Northern Ireland for research work with astronauts, this piece of equipment is known as a lower-body negative pressure box. Negative pressure is used to simulate the G-forces experienced during lift off. However, it was put to an alternative use at the St Pancras Hospital Geriatric Research Unit, where it was applied to research into the problems related to blood flow experienced when elderly patients stand up suddenly.

The patient lies in the box, enclosed at the feet and sealed at the chest. Negative pressure – less than the pressure outside the box – is applied, which changes the rate that blood returns to the heart through the veins.

Details

Category:
Laboratory Medicine
Object Number:
1993-1094
Materials:
foam, metal, plastic and wood
type:
lower-body negative pressure box
credit:
St Pancras Hospital