Chamberland filter, France, 1875-1884

Made:
1875-1884 in France
maker:
Louis Pasteur

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Chamberland filter used by Pasteur and Chamberland in work on anthrax and chicken cholera

This type of filter was invented by Charles Chamberland (1851-1908), a French microbiologist and colleague of Louis Pasteur. Chamberland showed that porous materials such as porcelain, when slightly heated, can keep hold of fine particles in suspension. By placing a piece of porcelain in a glass tube he created a sterilisation process for liquids which worked better than contemporary techniques. It was also useful for purifying water. Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) and Chamberland worked together studying chicken cholera and anthrax, two diseases which had had a huge impact on French agriculture, killing large numbers of animals. They used the Chamberland filter in their experiments, which were based on the germ theory of disease.

Details

Category:
Microbiology
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A63374
Materials:
filter, pottery and flask, glass
type:
filter
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • filtration equipment - particulates
credit:
Institut Pasteur