Gould-type microscope, London, England, 1820-1850

Made:
1820-1850 in London
maker:
Dollond family

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Gould microscope in chest pattern, by Dollond, London, 1800-1850

This microscope was developed between 1820 and 1827 by Charles Gould, an English microscope maker, and was first described in a catalogue in 1827. It is a portable microscope which can be folded into its box. The box also contains extra lenses, ivory specimen slides, forceps and a knife for mounting, and an aquatic box used to study objects in water.

It is also known as a Cary-Gould microscope, referring to the fact that Gould was an apprentice to William Cary (1759-1825), another optical instrument maker, during the time this microscope was designed. This microscope was made by Dolland, a family run scientific instrument making business.

Details

Category:
Microscopy (Wellcome)
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A1347
Materials:
body tube support, brass, body tube, brass, box, mahogany, box, velvet, lining lid, lenses, glass, limb, brass, pillar, brass and stage, brass
type:
microscope
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • optical instrument
credit:
On loan from the Wellcome Trust