Valentin knife, London, England, 1850-1870

Made:
1850-1870 in London
maker:
Weiss, John
Valentin knife, nickel-plated steel and ebony handle, by Weiss of London, c.1860. Dark grey background. A Valentin knife was one of the few knives able to cut slices of organs and soft tissues for microscopic examination. A Valentin knife was one of the few knives able to cut slices of organs and soft tissues for microscopic examination. A Valentin knife was one of the few knives able to cut slices of organs and soft tissues for microscopic examination. A Valentin knife was one of the few knives able to cut slices of organs and soft tissues for microscopic examination.

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Valentin knife, nickel-plated steel and ebony handle, by Weiss of London, c.1860. Dark grey background.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

A Valentin knife was one of the few knives able to cut slices of organs and soft tissues for microscopic examination.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

A Valentin knife was one of the few knives able to cut slices of organs and soft tissues for microscopic examination.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

A Valentin knife was one of the few knives able to cut slices of organs and soft tissues for microscopic examination.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

A Valentin knife was one of the few knives able to cut slices of organs and soft tissues for microscopic examination.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Valentin knife with sliding adjuster, nickel-plated steel and ebony handle, by Weiss of London, c.1860

A Valentin knife was one of the few knives able to cut slices of organs and soft tissues for microscopic examination. The double-bladed knife worked best when the blades were wet – best of all when submerged in water. When not in use the nickel-plated steel blades were put in leather covers to protect them. Named after its inventor, Professor Gabriel Valentin (1810-1883), a German-Swiss physiologist, the knife was popular from its invention in 1838 until the 1890s.

Details

Category:
Microscopy (Wellcome)
Object Number:
A135073
type:
valentin knife
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • surgical equipment
  • surgical instrument
  • surgical knife