Copper stomach warmer

Copper stomach warmer (stomach warmers) Copper stomach warmer (stomach warmers) Copper stomach warmer (stomach warmers) Copper stomach warmer (stomach warmers) Copper stomach warmer (stomach warmers)

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Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Copper stomach warmer, by Allen and Son, London, England, 1851-1900

The use of heat for treating stomach pain is a household is a popular treatment when it comes to pain relief as heat helps stomach muscles relax. A stomach warmer, as its name suggests, is made specifically for the stomach which is why it has been made with a concave shape. The idea of a hot water bottle date back to at least the 1500s, though these were made of different materials such as stoneware, brass, copper, and glass. Metallic materials were great conductors of heat, but users could easily scald themselves if the stomach warmer was not wrapped in fabric, which is why they were replaced by natural rubber ones following Charles Goodyear's invention of vulcanised rubber in the 1830s.

Details

Category:
Nursing & Hospital Furnishings
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A180929
Materials:
complete and copper
Measurements:
overall: 250 mm x 290 mm x 62 mm,
type:
stomach warmers
credit:
Wellcome Trust (Purchased from Stevens)