Glass nipple shield, Europe, 1801-1900

Made:
1801-1900 in Europe
maker:
Unknown
Glass nipple shield.  Whole object shot on black background. Glass nipple shield.  Whole object shot on black background.

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Glass nipple shield. Whole object shot on black background.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Glass nipple shield. Whole object shot on black background.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Glass nipple shield

Nipple shields are artificial nipples worn by mothers during breastfeeding. They have been made since at least the 1500s. They help babies latch on at the breast or protect a mother’s sore or damaged nipples.

Nipple shields have been made from lead, silver, wax, wood, pewter, tin, bone, ivory and glass. Most were not good choices. Lead, pewter and tin are toxic and could slowly poison the child. Wood, bone and ivory are difficult to clean and prove ideal environment for germs. Nipple shields are now made of rubber, latex or silicone.

Details

Category:
Nursing & Hospital Furnishings
Object Number:
A606829
type:
nipple shield
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment