Fluoroscopic screening unit, England, 1950-1960

Made:
1954-1959 in London
maker:
Electric and X-Ray Applications Limited

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Fluoroscopic screening unit by Exal, England, 1950-1960 with three items of radiological protection gear: lead lined apron, gloves and goggles

A fluoroscope is a form of X-ray apparatus. It created images of the inside of the body that were viewed in real time and without taking and developing X-ray photographs. Chest-screening frames like this one diagnosed diseases such as pulmonary tuberculosis. Doctors using radiography and X-rays found some ‘healthy’ patients still showed signs of the disease, such as lesions in the lungs. An X-ray machine like this was the only way to view inside the body without surgery. This machine belonged to a doctor in Harley Street, London, who donated it to the Science Museum's collections on his retirement in 1984.

Details

Category:
Radiomedicine
Object Number:
1986-1529
Materials:
protection, lead-rubber, screen, lead-glass and steel, sheet
type:
x-ray screening unit
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • x-ray machine
credit:
Besterman, E. (Harley Street)