Radiation protection apron

Made:
1920-1958 in Unknown place
maker:
Unknown
(A606875) Lead apron, for use as protection for X-ray technician, 1920 to 1958, and (A606876) Pair of lead gloves, for

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(A606875) Lead apron, for use as protection for X-ray technician, 1920 to 1958, and (A606876) Pair of lead gloves, for
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Lead apron, for use as protection for X-ray technician, 1920 to 1958

A layer of lead is incorporated into this apron. It helps protect the wearer, an X-ray technician, from harmful radiation. It became standard protective equipment. The apron is made of cloth. With the lead, it weighs around five kilos. It is seen with a pair of protective gloves (A606876). These are also lead lined.

X-rays were discovered in 1895 by Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen (1845-1923). X-rays were so-called because the nature of the newly discovered rays was unknown. The first committee to investigate possible ill effects of X-rays was formed three years later in 1898. Reports of burns and dermatitis due to the rays were frequent by this date.

Details

Category:
Radiomedicine
Object Number:
A606875
Materials:
cloth, incomplete, lead, leather and rubber
type:
radiation protection equipment
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • costume
credit:
Mann, J.J. and Kohnstamm