Glass measuring cylinder, England, 1777

Made:
1777 in Chester

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Clear glass measuring cylinder, graduated in Roman numerals, made for Dr. Haygarth in Chester, English, 1777

The inscription on the funnel mouth of this measuring cylinder reads “No.10 for Dr. Haygarth Chester w Fecit 1777”. Fecit means “made”. This type of in-scription on laboratory glassware is rare. The cylinder has a scale etched and painted on the side and is marked with Roman numerals. This may have been used to measure liquids. “Dr Haygarth” may be John Haygarth (1740-1827), a physician based in Chester, north-west England. Haygarth researched the spread of smallpox and was partly responsible for the founding of the Small-pox Society in Chester in 1778.

Details

Category:
Therapeutics
Object Number:
A650386
type:
measuring cyclinder
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • measuring device - instrument
  • measure - volume