Cupping set

Made:
1823-1830 in London
maker:
Weiss, John

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Cupping apparatus, in case, c.1823, by Weiss, English

Cupping was a method of bloodletting – a practice once carried out to treat a wide range of diseases and medical conditions. Warm glass cups were placed on the skin to draw blood to the surface of the skin. In wet cupping, the blood was released from the body using a lancet or scarificator (a set of spring-operated lancets). The set was made by John Weiss, a surgical instrument maker based in London.

Details

Category:
Therapeutics
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A600144
Materials:
body, copper and stopcock, brass
type:
cupping set
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • medical instrument
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • medical instrument