Red Cross dog collar, Berlin, Germany, 1914-1918

Made:
1914-1918 in Berlin

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Red Cross dog collar, leather with metal fittings, plastic Red Cross labels, by A. Kassner of Berlin, 1914 to 1918

Marked with the red cross – a universally recognised medical symbol – this collar was worn by a dog trained to locate dead and wounded soldiers during the First World War. Usually under the cover of night such dogs searched the no man’s land between opposing trenches. In Germany, they were known as Sanitäshunde – the Allies called them medical dogs. The dogs were able to tell the difference between a dead soldier and one that was merely unconscious.

Some dogs were equipped with bottles of brandy and rope so stretcher bearers and rescue parties including medics could find the injured man. Dogs were also used as messengers and were employed again in the Second World War.

Details

Category:
Therapeutics
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A652328
Materials:
complete, iron and leather
type:
dog collar