Sanger’s electrophoresis equipment

Made:
1950-1958 in England
maker:
Shandon Scientific Company Limited
Chromatography tank, model 500 chromatank, by Shandon, converted for electrophoresis.  Whole object shot on gallery Chromatography tank, model 500 chromatank, by Shandon, converted for electrophoresis.  Front 3/4 view of whole object Chromatography tank, model 500 chromatank, by Shandon, converted for electrophoresis.  Front 3/4 view of whole object Chromatography tank, model 500 chromatank, by Shandon, converted for electrophoresis.  Front 3/4 view of whole object

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Chromatography tank, model 500 chromatank, by Shandon, converted for electrophoresis. Whole object shot on gallery
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Chromatography tank, model 500 chromatank, by Shandon, converted for electrophoresis. Front 3/4 view of whole object
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Chromatography tank, model 500 chromatank, by Shandon, converted for electrophoresis. Front 3/4 view of whole object
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Chromatography tank, model 500 chromatank, by Shandon, converted for electrophoresis. Front 3/4 view of whole object
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Chromatography tank, model 500 chromatank, converted for electrophoresis by Shandon Scientific Limited, England, 1950-1958

Frederick Sanger (b. 1918), a British biochemist, used this equipment to study the structure of insulin by electrophoresis in the 1950s. Electrophoresis sepa-rates different proteins in cells using an electrical current. Molecules move at different rates depending on their electrical charge, forming different bands on filter paper. Sanger won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1958 for determining the structure of insulin.

Details

Category:
Biochemistry
Object Number:
1988-206
Materials:
glass, metal (unknown), plastic and steel (metal)
type:
electrophoresis equipment
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • scientific equipment
  • laboratory apparatus
credit:
Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge