Fly killer, New York, United States, 1888-1930

Made:
1888-1930 in Brooklyn
maker:
Harold Somers
Tin of 'Daisy' fly killer, by Harold Somers, New York. Full view from side, closed tin, edges visible, graduated grey Tin of 'Daisy' fly killer, by Harold Somers, New York. Full frontal view, closed tin, pale grey background.

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Tin of 'Daisy' fly killer, by Harold Somers, New York. Full view from side, closed tin, edges visible, graduated grey
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Tin of 'Daisy' fly killer, by Harold Somers, New York. Full frontal view, closed tin, pale grey background.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Tin of fly killer, by Harold Somers, New York

Priced at $1.55 (approximately $34 dollars today, or £17), the ‘Daisy Fly Killer’ was used in the home to kill flies and insects. The insects landed on innocent looking daisies that were actually soaked with a poisonous solution. The insect killer was reusable by adding more water to the poison granules in the tin. The ornamental design meant that the fly killer was not blatantly obvious in the home. Harold Somers patented his product on 28 February 1888.

Details

Category:
Public Health & Hygiene
Object Number:
A661038
Materials:
cloth, metal and wood
type:
poison