Experimental device for freezing cell cultures designed by James Lovelock and Chris Polge

Made:
1946-1969
maker:
James Ephraim Lovelock

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Experimental device for freezing cell cultures at 1 degree per minute to -70 degree for storage, developed by James Lovelock and Chris Polge at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Common Cold Research Unit, Harnham Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire, 1960-1969.

James Lovelock and Chris Polge built this slow-freezing device to aid their research into the effects of freezing on living cells. Lovelock discovered how freezing damages living cells and how glycerol can be used to prevent this. His results were published in two papers that became famous within the new discipline of cryobiology.

Details

Category:
Public Health & Hygiene
Object Number:
1990-84/5
Materials:
metal and wood (unidentified)
type:
cell freezer, epidemics (common cold) and virology
credit:
MRC Common Cold Unit