Tuberculin syringe

Made:
1901-1930
Tuberculin syringe (syringe) Tuberculin syringe (syringe)

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Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Hypodermic syringe, steel and glass, for tuberculin, possibly German, early 20th century, in cardboard box and metal case

Details

Category:
Public Health & Hygiene
Object Number:
1981-987
Materials:
steel, glass, case, steel (plated), box, cardboard and box, metal
Measurements:
syringe: .085kg
type:
syringe

Parts

Tuberculin hypodermic syringe, Germany, 1901-1930

Tuberculin hypodermic syringe, Germany, 1901-1930

Hypodermic syringe, steel and glass, for tuberculin, in metal case with lid and brass wire pieces, possibly German, 1901-1930 (see note).


Tuberculin is injected into the skin to see whether a person has been exposed to tuberculosis-causing bacteria. If the skin shows a reaction after 48 hours, they have been exposed. The tests help catch the disease before it develops and prevents its spread. This type of test is known as the Mantoux test, named after Charles Mantoux (1877-1947), who invented it in 1907. The test is still used today, especially to confirm the results of other tuberculosis tests.