Ophthalmoscope, Paris, France, 1845-1865

Made:
1845-1865 in Paris
maker:
Lüer

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Very early ophthalmoscope, mid 19th century, French, by Luer

Herman von Helmholtz (1821-1894) invented the ophthalmoscope in 1851. It became the key instrument for viewing the retina and other internal structures of the eye. This simple steel ophthalmoscope is a very early example. It was made by German instrument maker Hermann Wülfing Lüer, in Paris.

Early ophthalmoscopes used reflected sunlight from mirrors to view the inner eye. Modern examples use a built-in light source such as a halogen bulb. They assess the inner eye and help diagnose complaints such as glaucoma. Glaucoma is increased pressure within the eyeball, leading to loss of sight.

Details

Category:
Ophthalmology
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A600066
type:
ophthalmoscope
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • ophthalmic equipment
  • ophthalmic instrument