George III's glass sphere

Made:
1761 in Fleet Street
maker:
George Adams
Pair of glass jars. 9" high with brass collars and taps, with copper elbow tubes (1927-1311).
      Double brass stand for Group shot of  1927-1311/1, 1927-1311/2, Apparatus for the comparison of airs, 1761. George Adams, instrument maker to

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Pair of glass jars. 9" high with brass collars and taps, with copper elbow tubes (1927-1311). Double brass stand for
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Group shot of 1927-1311/1, 1927-1311/2, Apparatus for the comparison of airs, 1761. George Adams, instrument maker to
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Glass sphere containing glass rod with perforated ball at end made by George Adams, Fleet Street, London, 1761.

This apparatus was made for King George III in 1761 by George Adams, very soon after he ascended the throne in 1760. It was part of Adams' pneumatics lectures and was intended to be used with the air pump. It allowed the demonstrator to compare 'airs' from different sources. Adams called the appratus 'a convenient apparatus to examine a portion of air, taken by chance or choice either in the atmosphere or in a place filled with vapours or known exhalations'. The apparatus fitted on to the air pump, acting as an attachment. Vapours from burning matter for example, filled the large glass vessel on the right. The glass sphere on the left provided clean dry air from the atmosphere. Operating the pump drew the two air samples into the central jars where they could be compared.

Details

Category:
King George III
Object Number:
1927-1333
Materials:
brass, cardboard, glass, paper (fibre product) and sealing wax
credit:
King's College, London