Greig Smith-type artery forceps, London, 1895-1902

Made:
1895-1902 in London
maker:
Down Brothers

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Greig Smith artery forceps, steel, nickel plated, by Down Bros. of London, early 20th century

Artery forceps are used to compress the artery and seal small blood vessels or to hold the artery out of the way during surgery. These forceps were invented in 1895 by James Greig Smith (1854-1897), a Scottish surgeon. It was quite common for surgeons to invent new instruments to aid their work.

These forceps have hollow jaws which could compress vessels at the sides. They could also hold tissues that ballooned when filled with blood without causing any damage to them.

Details

Category:
Surgery
Object Number:
A600293
type:
artery forceps and surgery (cardiovascular system) greig smith, artery forceps and surgery (cardiovascular system)
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • surgical equipment
  • surgical instrument
  • forceps