Horsley-type skull saw, London, England, 1900-1926

Made:
1900-1926 in London
maker:
Krohne and Sesemann

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Horsley's skull saw, nickel-plated with stainless steel blade, c.1930, by Krohne and Sesemann

The saw was used to cut open the skull and access the brain. It was invented by Sir Victor Horsley (1857-1916), an English surgeon and physiologist who pioneered the discipline of neurosurgery in the late 1800s. It has a nickel plated handle and a stainless steel blade. The handle is especially moulded to fit into the surgeon’s hand. The name of the makers, Krohne & Sesemann, is punched on to the blade.

Details

Category:
Surgery
Object Number:
A600898
Materials:
blade, steel, frame, nickel-plated and frame, steel
type:
skull saw
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • surgical equipment
  • surgical instrument
  • surgical saw