Lister-type tourniquet, London, England, 1866-1927

Made:
1866-1927 in London
maker:
Arnold and Sons

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Lister's tourniquet for compression of the aorta, large semi-circular steel frame, with fixed and gavot-type adjustable pressure pad by Arnold, c. 1890

This tourniquet was used during surgery to compress the abdominal aorta, the largest artery in the abdomen. It was invented by Joseph Lister (1827-1912), the pioneer of antisepsis, while he was working at the Royal Infirmary Glasgow. One of the pads is fixed and the other is easily adjustable. It was not uncommon for surgeons to invent new instruments to aid their work, prototypes of which were manufactured for them by instrument makers such as Arnold & Sons (who made this example). Lister abandoned the tourniquet after a number of modifications because it damaged other internal organs, such as the bowel, when in use.

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Details

Category:
Surgery
Object Number:
A41383
Materials:
frame, steel, pad (1), felt, pad (1), steel, pad (2), felt and pad (2), wood
type:
tourniquet
credit:
James Arnold and Sons

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