Model to demonstrate the path of a projectile

Made:
1740-1753
maker:
unknown

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Group shot of various demonstration models. From left to right: 1927-1929 - Model of a rat's tail crane, before 1753.
Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collections
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group Collections
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group Collections
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group Collections
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group Collections
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Model used to demonstrate the path of a projectile made before 1753, maker and place of production unknown, but thought to have belonged to Stephen Demainbray. The model is accompanied by three balls, two made of ivory and one of brass.

The model to demonstrate the path of a projectile consists of a wooden, curved channel along which the accompanying balls are rolled. It was used to demonstrate motion. When the balls start rolling at the top of the channel and then fall freely, their subsequent paths follow a particular parabola. This can be demonstrated by a series of brass rings attached to the backboard and forming a parabolic curve, which the balls pass through. The model was itemised in the Queen's Catalogue and therefore believed to have belonged to Stephen Demainbray. Demainbray worked as superintendent at the King's observatory at Kew from 1768 and his collection of instruments and apparatus was absorbed into the King's own collection.

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Details

Category:
King George III
Object Number:
1927-1112
Materials:
brass, ivory and mahogany
type:
model - representation
taxonomy:
  • visual and verbal communication
credit:
King's College, London

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