King George III's friction machine

Made:
1762
maker:
George Adams

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Friction machine, 1762. This machine shows that friction is due to weight acting on the moving parts, and also
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Friction machine made for King george III by George Adams in 1762, Fleet Street, London.

George Adams made the frictio machine for King George III in 1762, just a few years after he ascended the throne in 1760. Adams referred to this machine when he began his section on motion in his accompanying Course on Mechanics. The machine shows that friction is due to weight acting on the moving parts, not the area in contact with them. When the spoked wheel was spun, it would turn 'more than the space of a mile', according to Adams. Alternatively a watch spring could make the wheel oscillate. Friction was provided using the small brass lever and the number of oscillations with and without friction compared.

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Details

Category:
King George III
Object Number:
1927-1116
Materials:
brass, mahogany, paper (fibre product) and steel
type:
friction machines
credit:
King's College, London

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