"Transpulmin" quinine and camphor ampoules

Made:
1930-1970 in England
Packet containing "Transpulmin" quinine and camphor ampoules, by Camden Chemical Co. Ltd.,  London,

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Packet containing "Transpulmin" quinine and camphor ampoules, by Camden Chemical Co. Ltd., London,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Carton containing "Transpulmin" quinine and 12 camphor ampoules & instruction leaflet, by Camden Chemical Co. Ltd., London, 1930-1970

‘Transpulmin’ is a treatment made from quinine and camphor. Quinine is used as a pain and fever reliever and camphor is used to soothe irritation and itching on the skin and could also kill bacteria. Each of the ingredients is extracted from the bark of a particular tree. ‘Transpulmin’ was used to treat infections of the chest and lungs, especially bronchitis, and was also used to help asthma. It was given by injection into the buttocks. This box came with twelve ampoules of the drug, an instruction leaflet and a metal file to open the glass ampoules. Now advertised as a natural medicine, ‘Transpulmin’ is still available.

Details

Category:
Materia Medica & Pharmacology
Object Number:
1979-464/10
type:
quinine
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • container - receptacle
  • vessel
credit:
Donated by Barclays Bank