Demainbray's Newcomen engine model

Made:
1720

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Model of Newcomen engine. From a colour transparency in the Science Museum Photographic Archive.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Model Newcomen engine, before 1753. Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) designed an atmospheric or 'steam' engine in 1712. It
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Model Newcomen engine, before 1753. Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) designed an atmospheric or 'steam' engine in 1712. It
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Model Newcomen engine, before 1753. Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) designed an atmospheric or 'steam' engine in 1712. It
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Model Newcomen engine, before 1753. Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) designed an atmospheric or 'steam' engine in 1712. It
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Model Newcomen engine, before 1753. Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) designed an atmospheric or 'steam' engine in 1712. It
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Model Newcomen engine, before 1753. Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) designed an atmospheric or 'steam' engine in 1712. It
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Model Newcomen engine, before 1753. Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) designed an atmospheric or 'steam' engine in 1712. It
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Model Newcomen engine, before 1753. Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) designed an atmospheric or 'steam' engine in 1712. It
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Model Newcomen engine, before 1753. Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) designed an atmospheric or 'steam' engine in 1712. It
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Model Newcomen engine, before 1753. Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) designed an atmospheric or 'steam' engine in 1712. It
King's College, London| Enquiries to Science Museum, London
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Newcomen engine model, maker unknwon, before 1753. Once belonged to Stephen Demainbray.

Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729) designed an atmospheric or steam engine in 1712. It was safer and more effective than the earlier Savery engine and was widely used to drain water out of mines. This is a model of one built at Griff colliery, near Nuneaton, Warwickshire, in 1720. Known at the time as a 'fire engine', it was described by J. T. Desaguliers, a natural philosophy lecturer, in 1744. Water was heated in the boiler and the resulting steam was let into the cylinder, pushing up the piston. The steam was then condensed, bringing down the piston. The piston rocked the beam which worked the pump. This model once belonged to Stephen Demainbray and was used by him in his lectures on natural philosophy. Demainbray worked as superintendent at the King's observatory at Kew from 1768 and his collection of instruments and apparatus was absorbed into the King's own collection.

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Details

Category:
King George III
Object Number:
1927-1619
Materials:
beech, brass, complete, copper, cotton (fibre), iron, oak (wood), paper (fibre product), tinplate
type:
steam engines
taxonomy:
  • visual and verbal communication
credit:
King's College, London

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