Horse Ambulance

Horse Ambulance (ambulance) Horse Ambulance (ambulance)

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Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Horse-drawn horse ambulance, London & South Western Railway, ex Waterloo Station, with stretcher and horse inside.

The railways were at one time the largest user of horses outside the British Army - horses were used both for the distribution and delivery of goods from stations and depots and also shunting railway wagons in yards. They required a lot of care and a horse was a valuable asset to the railway companies. Welfare and care was a major concern and a horse ambulance for recovering sick or injured animals from the streets was vitally important. The canvas webb between the sides of the vehicle being used to support the belly of the injured animal, and the accomodation roofed over. The ramp at the rear doubled up as a high tailboard to protect the injured horse and also allow a gentle ramp to help with boarding. Drawn by two or more horses, the driver sat outside at the front. Some railway company's ambulances were adapted from vehicles used to transport prize cattle to the railhead.

Details

Category:
Road Vehicles (Railway)
Object Number:
1975-7061
Materials:
metal (unknown), fibre (unidentified), wood (unidentified), textile, paint and rubber (unidentified)
Measurements:
overall: 3110 mm x 2560 mm x 4770 mm,
type:
ambulance
credit:
British Rail, Historical Relics