first sealed-off travelling wave tube, 1945-1946

Made:
1945-1946 in England

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

First sealed-off travelling wave tube, made by Rudolf Kompfner, England, 1945-1946.

Rudolph Kompfner, an Austrian-born physicist who emigrated to Britain in 1933, invented the travelling wave tube during 1942 at Birmingham University, and subsequently developed it at Clarendon Laboratories, Oxford, and with J R Pierce at the Bell Telephone Laboratories. The first practical application of travelling wave tubes was in terminal and repeater stations which relayed BBC television programmes between Manchester and Edinburgh. A travelling wave tube was used on board the Telstar satellite, launched in 1963, transmitting the first television pictures across the Atlantic through space.

Details

Category:
Electronic Components
Object Number:
1952-369
Materials:
copper (alloy), glass and plastic (unidentified)
Measurements:
widest point: 860 mm 40 mm, .241 kg
narrowest point: 860 mm 15 mm,
type:
thermionic valve
taxonomy:
  • component - object
credit:
Donated by K. Kompfner