Cooke and Wheatstone's ABC telegraph transmitter

Made:
1840 in England
inventor:
CHARLES WHEATSTONE
Cooke and Wheatstone's ABC telegraph transmitter. Wheatstone, Sir Charles, unknown maker, England, UK, 1840. 
      
      After Cooke and Wheatstone's ABC telegraph transmitter. Wheatstone, Sir Charles, unknown maker, England, UK, 1840. 
      
      After

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Cooke and Wheatstone's ABC telegraph transmitter. Wheatstone, Sir Charles, unknown maker, England, UK, 1840. After
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Cooke and Wheatstone's ABC telegraph transmitter. Wheatstone, Sir Charles, unknown maker, England, UK, 1840. After
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Cooke and Wheatstone's ABC telegraph transmitter, unknown maker, England, 1840.

Charles Wheatstone (1802-1875) was always interested in developing electric telegraph systems that did not require knowledge of a code. The ABC telegraph worked like a rotary telephone dial and could be used with little training. To transmit, letters were selected by pressing the appropriate buttons and rotating the handle continuously. The indicator stepped round the dial until the desired letter was reached, sending the correct number of electrical impulses to the receiver whose indicator stepped round in unison. It was slow, only transmitting 15 words a minute, but was simple to use.

Details

Category:
Telecommunications
Object Number:
1884-103
Materials:
copper (alloy), ivory, steel (metal) and wood (unidentified)
type:
telegraph
taxonomy:
  • component - object
credit:
Donated by R Sabine