24 segment Baudot plate distributor, 1870-1924

Made:
1870-1924 in France

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

24 segment Baudot plate distributor, unknown maker, France, 1870-1924.

The Baudot telegraph system allowed several telegraph messages, typically four, to be sent along the same wire simultaneously. It was developed in France by Émile Baudot (1845-1903), who made use of the fact that a single operator did not make efficient use of the line. The operators worked in exact synchronisation, each sending their segment when a 'cadence note' sounded. The distributor was central to the operation of the Baudot telegraph system, as it connected each transmitter and receiver to the single line in turn. It operated using revolving brushes of flexible metal, which were driven by weights or an electric motor. These brushes swept over the surface of the plate segments in pairs.

Details

Category:
Telecommunications
Object Number:
1924-155
Materials:
copper (alloy), metal (unknown), plastic (unidentified) and textile
type:
telegraph
taxonomy:
  • component - object
credit:
Donated by the General Post Office (West)