Morse key with send-receive switch, 1900-1920

Made:
1900-1920 in United Kingdom
maker:
General Post Office

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Morse key with send-receive switch, made by the General Post Office, British, 1900-1920.

With a single-current telegraph key the position of the relay is restored to the normal position when current ceases by a magnetic bias or by a spring in tension. In other words, signal currents only flow in the line when the key is depressed. In the double-current system a current in the reverse direction is used to restore the relay to the spacing side. The 'send-receive' switch is necessary to disconnect the key from line while signals are being received, otherwise a spacing current flows along the line, preventing signals from being sent from the other end.

Details

Category:
Telecommunications
Object Number:
1953-112
Materials:
brass (copper, zinc alloy), glass, plastic (unidentified), steel (metal) and wood (unidentified)
type:
telegraph
taxonomy:
  • component - object
credit:
Donated by the Institution of Electrical Engineers