Morse key, 1850-1870.

Made:
1850-1870 in United Kingdom
Morse key, 1850-1870. Three quarter view whole object on graduated grey background. From a colour transparency in the Morse key, 1850-1870. Three quarter view whole object on white background. From a colour transparency in the Science

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Morse key, 1850-1870. Three quarter view whole object on graduated grey background. From a colour transparency in the
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Morse key, 1850-1870. Three quarter view whole object on white background. From a colour transparency in the Science
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Morse key, unknown maker, British, 1850-1870.

Morse code was developed by Samuel Morse and his assistant Theodore Vail, and uses a series of dots and dashes for sending messages. This is a camelback Morse key, named for its hump. They were among the first telegraph keys to be used commercially. Many were still in use when the British Post Office took over the inland telegraph companies in 1870.

Details

Category:
Telecommunications
Object Number:
1964-81
Materials:
bakelite, copper (alloy), metal (unknown) and plastic (unidentified)
type:
telegraph peripheral
taxonomy:
  • component - object
  • telegraph instrument
credit:
Donated by the National Postal Museum