Wheatstone receiver (Morse inker), 1867

Made:
1867 in United Kingdom

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Wheatstone receiver (Morse inker), unknown maker, probably British, 1867.

The Morse inker was invented by an Austrian, Thomas John in 1854. A rotating ink wheel was lifted when a current was received, marking a strip of paper. The mechanism was driven by a falling weight. They were used widely across Europe, with the most popular inkers being made by the German firm Siemens and Halske, while in the United States, embossers remained more common. This inker was part of Charles Wheatstone's automatic telegraph system.

Details

Category:
Telecommunications
Object Number:
1964-84
Materials:
brass (copper, zinc alloy), glass, metal (unknown), paper (fibre product), steel (metal) and wood (unidentified)
type:
telegraph
taxonomy:
  • component - object
credit:
Donated by the National Postal Museun