Early stag horn implement, possibly mesolithic (6000 BC) found in Thames at Wandsworth

Made:
6000 BCE
maker:
Unknown

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Early stag horn implement, possibly mesolithic (6000 BC) found in Thames at Wandsworth, 1928

Early stag horn implement, possibly Mesolithic (6000 BC) found in Thames at Wandsworth, 1928

This implement, made form the horn of a red deer, was found in the Thames at Wandsworth in 1928. It may date back to the Mesolithic period, about 6000 B.C.

The large hole, for attaching a shaft, was no doubt drilled with a flint, and there is reason to suppose that in many cases, a suitably shaped flint would have been fixed in the natural cavity of the bone,

This adze-like implement could be used for a variety of purposes including that of digging with the primitive hoe thus formed.

Details

Category:
Agricultural Engineering
Object Number:
1929-970
Measurements:
overall (as displayed): 140 mm x 215 mm x 65 mm, 0.355 kg
type:
model - representation
taxonomy:
  • visual and verbal communication
credit:
Cmdr. E.C. Shankland