Cuff-type compound microscope

Made:
1790-1810 in London
maker:
Dollond family

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Cuff type compound microscope by Dollond, English, circa 1800

A compound microscope uses two or more sets of lenses. The Cuff-type microscope was invented by John Cuff (1708-1772). It was a very popular design, being easy to focus and, with its box-shaped stand, more stable than many other microscopes, which tended to have tripod stands.

This one has a drawer to store additional lenses and specimen holders. The mirror underneath the tube is known as a Lieberkühn reflector and it helped to light the object being studied. This microscope was made by one of the Dolland family, well known optical instrument makers.

Details

Category:
Microscopy (Wellcome)
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A601261 Pt1
Materials:
brass (copper, zinc alloy), glass, ivory, mahogany (wood), metal (unknown), paper (fibre product) and textile
Measurements:
overall: 365 mm x 167 mm x 167 mm, 1.88 kg
type:
compound microscope
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • optical instrument
  • microscope
credit:
Sutcliffe, H.