Curved sensor net used to record electrical signals of the brain, Europe, 1990-1998

Made:
1988-1990 in United States
maker:
Electrical Geodesics, Inc.
Geodesic sensor net, 64 electrodes with wires, made of plastic, sponge, silver chloride electrodes and copper wires,

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Geodesic sensor net, 64 electrodes with wires, made of plastic, sponge, silver chloride electrodes and copper wires,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Geodesic brain impulse sensor net, by Electrical Geodesics Incorporated, United States, 1988-90. Plastic sensors with sponge and silver chloride electrodes on copper wire, for EEG recordings, particularly of young children. Used at the Cognitive Development Unit, University College London, 1990-1998.

Sixty-four electrodes form this geodesic sensor net, which picks up weak electrical signals from the brain. This net was used at the Cognitive Development Unit at University College London to investigate how young babies recognise faces. Recordings of the electrical signals of the brain are known as electroencephalograms (EEGs).

Details

Category:
Psychology, Psychiatry & Anthropometry
Object Number:
1999-1012
Materials:
electronic components, plastic (unidentified), silver chloride, sponge and steel (metal)
type:
geodesic sensor net
credit:
Birkbeck College, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development