Electrode head board, Bristol, England, 1958

Made:
1958 in Bristol
maker:
McMurdo Limited

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Electrode head board made at the Burden Neurological Institute to connect electrodes implanted in a patient's brain to an EEG recorder. The 34-way sockets attached to each side of the head of the patient (see 2001-197 for an example) were connected via the rainbow-coloured cables at the back of this distribution board to 34 blue and 34 yellow sockets on the front of the board. The black and white sockets led to the EEG recorder.

This electrode head board was used in neurological experiments upon the brain. It was made at the Burden Neurological Institute in Bristol. The 34-way sockets on the patient’s head connect by 34-way plugs at the back of this distribution board to individual sockets on the front. Areas of the brain were stimulated and responses recorded by placing the electrodes onto the head. Recordings of the electrical signals of the brain are known as electroencephalograms (EEGs).

The Burden Neurological Institute was founded by the Reverend Burden in 1939. It is an independently-funded research unit. It specialises in the human nervous system and human neurological disorders.

Details

Category:
Psychology, Psychiatry & Anthropometry
Object Number:
2001-192
Materials:
metal and plastic
type:
electrode
credit:
The Burden Neurological Institute