Insulin shock therapy records book for male patients

Made:
1946-1948 in Europe

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Insulin shock therapy records book for male patients, 1946-1948.

Insulin is usually thought of as a medicine treating diabetes. However, in the 1940s it was a shock therapy for patients with severe mental health illnesses. It was known as ‘coma therapy’ because patients tended to enter comas for up to an hour. It was a reversible treatment that allowed doctors to observe a patient’s responses and adapt the dosage of insulin accordingly. Its use overlapped with early electric shock therapy. Both treatments aimed to ‘re-stabilise’ the brain after treatment. This book records insulin treatment given to male patients from 1946-1948 at an unspecified institution. It records the time, date and responses of the patient. These ranged from mild perspiration to fits and comas.

Details

Category:
Psychology, Psychiatry & Anthropometry
Object Number:
1996-271/8
type:
book
credit:
Princess Royal Hospital