Mintrop field seismograph, recording apparatus and box, for geophysical prospecting

Made:
1921 in Hannover
maker:
Ludger Mintrop
and
Seismos GmbH
Mintrop field seismograph, recording apparatus and box, for geophysical prospecting (seismograph) Mintrop field seismograph, recording apparatus and box, for geophysical prospecting (seismograph) Mintrop field seismograph, recording apparatus and box, for geophysical prospecting (seismograph) Mintrop field seismograph, recording apparatus and box, for geophysical prospecting (seismograph) Mintrop field seismograph, recording apparatus and box, for geophysical prospecting (seismograph)

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Mintrop refraction field seismograph, recording apparatus and box for geophysical prospecting, designed by Ludger Mintrop and made by Seismos GmbH, Hannover, Germany, c.1921. This instrument type was the earliest practical field seismograph.

Geophysical prospecting methods apply principles of physics in order to locate underground mineral or oil deposits. Field seismographs rely on explosive charges, accurately timed, sending energy waves through subsurface layers to the receiving apparatus. Refraction seismology interprets the waves which are refracted and delayed by passage through different strata.

This instrument detects the vertical component of ground motion through a lead sphere carried on a leaf spring. The motion is initially magnified by lever action of the aluminium cone. The cone vertex rotates a spindle with attached mirror. A light-beam from the recorder box is reflected from the mirror and again magnified before the beam is recorded photographically on a moving chart together with a time-trace. The explosive charge was set off at a known distance and reached the instrument as an air-borne pressure wave giving the exact time of the start of each operation.

Ludger Mintrop was a German surveyor, mining engineer and geophysicist. After developing sound-ranging seismographs to locate artillery positions during the First World War, he applied similar techniques to seismic exploration of subsurface geological structures. He founded the company Seismos in 1921 after successful tests in Germany detecting salt domes – associated with deposits of oil.

Details

Category:
Geophysics
Object Number:
1931-766
type:
seismograph
credit:
Geophysical Co. Ltd.

Parts

Mintrop refraction field seismograph with recording apparatus, for geophysical prospecting

Mintrop refraction field seismograph with recording apparatus, for geophysical prospecting

Mintrop refraction field seismograph, recording apparatus and stand for geophysical prospecting, designed by Ludger Mintrop and made by Seismos GmbH, Hannover, Germany, c.1921. This instrument type was the earliest practical field seismograph.


Geophysical prospecting methods apply principles of physics in order to locate underground mineral or oil deposits. Field seismographs rely on explosive charges, accurately timed, sending energy waves through subsurface layers to the receiving apparatus. Refraction seismology interprets the waves which are refracted and delayed by passage through different strata.

This instrument detects the vertical component of ground motion through a lead sphere carried on a leaf spring. The motion is initially magnified by lever action of the aluminium cone. The cone vertex rotates a spindle with attached mirror. A light-beam from the recorder box is reflected from the mirror and again magnified before the beam is recorded photographically on a moving chart together with a time-trace. The explosive charge was set off at a known distance and reached the instrument as an air-borne pressure wave giving the exact time of the start of each operation.

Ludger Mintrop was a German surveyor, mining engineer and geophysicist. After developing sound-ranging seismographs to locate artillery positions during the First World War, he applied similar techniques to seismic exploration of subsurface geological structures. He founded the company Seismos in 1921 after successful tests in Germany detecting salt domes – associated with deposits of oil.

Photographic registration apparatus from Mintrop refraction field seismograph for geophysical prospecting

Photographic registration apparatus from Mintrop refraction field seismograph for geophysical prospecting

Photographic registration apparatus, or Lichtschreiber, from Mintrop refraction field seismograph for geophysical prospecting, designed by Ludger Mintrop and made by Seismos GmbH, Hannover, Germany, c.1921. This instrument type was the earliest practical field seismograph.


Geophysical prospecting methods apply principles of physics in order to locate underground mineral or oil deposits. Field seismographs rely on explosive charges, accurately timed, sending energy waves through subsurface layers to the receiving apparatus. Refraction seismology interprets the waves which are refracted and delayed by passage through different strata.

This instrument detects the vertical component of ground motion through a lead sphere carried on a leaf spring. The motion is initially magnified by lever action of the aluminium cone. The cone vertex rotates a spindle with attached mirror. A light-beam from the recorder box is reflected from the mirror and again magnified before the beam is recorded photographically on a moving chart together with a time-trace. The explosive charge was set off at a known distance and reached the instrument as an air-borne pressure wave giving the exact time of the start of each operation.

Ludger Mintrop was a German surveyor, mining engineer and geophysicist. After developing sound-ranging seismographs to locate artillery positions during the First World War, he applied similar techniques to seismic exploration of subsurface geological structures. He founded the company Seismos in 1921 after successful tests in Germany detecting salt domes – associated with deposits of oil.

Object Number:
1931-766 Pt1/1
:
Part of:
1931-766 Pt1
Vertical pendulum from Mintrop refraction field seismograph apparatus for geophysical prospecting

Vertical pendulum from Mintrop refraction field seismograph apparatus for geophysical prospecting

Field seismograph (Feldseismograph) vertical pendulum (Vertikalpendel) from Mintrop refraction seismograph for geophysical prospecting, designed by Ludger Mintrop and made by Seismos GmbH, Hannover, Germany, c.1921. This instrument type was the earliest practical field seismograph. It consists of a lead sphere carried on a horizontal leaf spring, contained within an aluminium sphere.


Geophysical prospecting methods apply principles of physics in order to locate underground mineral or oil deposits. Field seismographs rely on explosive charges, accurately timed, sending energy waves through subsurface layers to the receiving apparatus. Refraction seismology interprets the waves which are refracted and delayed by passage through different strata.

This instrument detects the vertical component of ground motion through a lead sphere carried on a leaf spring. The motion is initially magnified by lever action of the aluminium cone. The cone vertex rotates a spindle with attached mirror. A light-beam from the recorder box is reflected from the mirror and again magnified before the beam is recorded photographically on a moving chart together with a time-trace. The explosive charge was set off at a known distance and reached the instrument as an air-borne pressure wave giving the exact time of the start of each operation.

Ludger Mintrop was a German surveyor, mining engineer and geophysicist. After developing sound-ranging seismographs to locate artillery positions during the First World War, he applied similar techniques to seismic exploration of subsurface geological structures. He founded the company Seismos in 1921 after successful tests in Germany detecting salt domes – associated with deposits of oil.

Materials:
lead (metal) and aluminium (metal)
Object Number:
1931-766 Pt1/2
type:
seismograph
Part of:
1931-766 Pt1
Upper section of tripod stand for photographic registration apparatus, from Mintrop refraction seismograph for geophysical prospecting

Upper section of tripod stand for photographic registration apparatus, from Mintrop refraction seismograph for geophysical prospecting

Upper section of tripod stand for photographic registration apparatus, from Mintrop refraction field seismograph for geophysical prospecting, designed by Ludger Mintrop and made by Seismos GmbH, Hannover, Germany, c.1921. This instrument type was the earliest practical field seismograph.


Geophysical prospecting methods apply principles of physics in order to locate underground mineral or oil deposits. Field seismographs rely on explosive charges, accurately timed, sending energy waves through subsurface layers to the receiving apparatus. Refraction seismology interprets the waves which are refracted and delayed by passage through different strata.

This instrument detects the vertical component of ground motion through a lead sphere carried on a leaf spring. The motion is initially magnified by lever action of the aluminium cone. The cone vertex rotates a spindle with attached mirror. A light-beam from the recorder box is reflected from the mirror and again magnified before the beam is recorded photographically on a moving chart together with a time-trace. The explosive charge was set off at a known distance and reached the instrument as an air-borne pressure wave giving the exact time of the start of each operation.

Ludger Mintrop was a German surveyor, mining engineer and geophysicist. After developing sound-ranging seismographs to locate artillery positions during the First World War, he applied similar techniques to seismic exploration of subsurface geological structures. He founded the company Seismos in 1921 after successful tests in Germany detecting salt domes – associated with deposits of oil.

Materials:
aluminium
Object Number:
1931-766 Pt1/3
type:
stand - support furniture
Part of:
1931-766 Pt1
Legs from tripod stand from Mintrop refraction seismograph for geophysical prospecting

Legs from tripod stand from Mintrop refraction seismograph for geophysical prospecting

Lower sections of adjustable legs from tripod stand for photographic registration apparatus, from Mintrop refraction seismograph for geophysical prospecting, designed by Ludger Mintrop and made by Seismos GmbH, Hannover, Germany, c.1921. This instrument type was the earliest practical field seismograph.


Geophysical prospecting methods apply principles of physics in order to locate underground mineral or oil deposits. Field seismographs rely on explosive charges, accurately timed, sending energy waves through subsurface layers to the receiving apparatus. Refraction seismology interprets the waves which are refracted and delayed by passage through different strata.

This instrument detects the vertical component of ground motion through a lead sphere carried on a leaf spring. The motion is initially magnified by lever action of the aluminium cone. The cone vertex rotates a spindle with attached mirror. A light-beam from the recorder box is reflected from the mirror and again magnified before the beam is recorded photographically on a moving chart together with a time-trace. The explosive charge was set off at a known distance and reached the instrument as an air-borne pressure wave giving the exact time of the start of each operation.

Ludger Mintrop was a German surveyor, mining engineer and geophysicist. After developing sound-ranging seismographs to locate artillery positions during the First World War, he applied similar techniques to seismic exploration of subsurface geological structures. He founded the company Seismos in 1921 after successful tests in Germany detecting salt domes – associated with deposits of oil.

Materials:
aluminium
Object Number:
1931-766 Pt1/4
type:
stand - support furniture
Part of:
1931-766 Pt1
Box for Mintrop refraction field seismograph with recording apparatus, for geophysical prospecting

Box for Mintrop refraction field seismograph with recording apparatus, for geophysical prospecting

Box for Mintrop refraction field seismograph, recording apparatus and stand for geophysical prospecting, designed by Ludger Mintrop and made by Seismos GmbH, Hannover, Germany, c.1921. This instrument type was the earliest practical field seismograph.


Geophysical prospecting methods apply principles of physics in order to locate underground mineral or oil deposits. Field seismographs rely on explosive charges, accurately timed, sending energy waves through subsurface layers to the receiving apparatus. Refraction seismology interprets the waves which are refracted and delayed by passage through different strata.

This instrument detects the vertical component of ground motion through a lead sphere carried on a leaf spring. The motion is initially magnified by lever action of the aluminium cone. The cone vertex rotates a spindle with attached mirror. A light-beam from the recorder box is reflected from the mirror and again magnified before the beam is recorded photographically on a moving chart together with a time-trace. The explosive charge was set off at a known distance and reached the instrument as an air-borne pressure wave giving the exact time of the start of each operation.

Ludger Mintrop was a German surveyor, mining engineer and geophysicist. After developing sound-ranging seismographs to locate artillery positions during the First World War, he applied similar techniques to seismic exploration of subsurface geological structures. He founded the company Seismos in 1921 after successful tests in Germany detecting salt domes – associated with deposits of oil.

Object Number:
1931-766 Pt2
type:
box
Case for field seismograph vertical pendulum from Mintrop refraction seismograph for geophysical prospecting

Case for field seismograph vertical pendulum from Mintrop refraction seismograph for geophysical prospecting

Leather case for field seismograph (Feldseismograph) vertical pendulum (Vertikalpendel) from Mintrop refraction seismograph for geophysical prospecting, designed by Ludger Mintrop and made by Seismos GmbH, Hannover, Germany, c.1921. This instrument type was the earliest practical field seismograph.


Geophysical prospecting methods apply principles of physics in order to locate underground mineral or oil deposits. Field seismographs rely on explosive charges, accurately timed, sending energy waves through subsurface layers to the receiving apparatus. Refraction seismology interprets the waves which are refracted and delayed by passage through different strata.

This instrument detects the vertical component of ground motion through a lead sphere carried on a leaf spring. The motion is initially magnified by lever action of the aluminium cone. The cone vertex rotates a spindle with attached mirror. A light-beam from the recorder box is reflected from the mirror and again magnified before the beam is recorded photographically on a moving chart together with a time-trace. The explosive charge was set off at a known distance and reached the instrument as an air-borne pressure wave giving the exact time of the start of each operation.

Ludger Mintrop was a German surveyor, mining engineer and geophysicist. After developing sound-ranging seismographs to locate artillery positions during the First World War, he applied similar techniques to seismic exploration of subsurface geological structures. He founded the company Seismos in 1921 after successful tests in Germany detecting salt domes – associated with deposits of oil.

Materials:
leather
Object Number:
1931-766/4
type:
case - container