Telescopic study of the Moon

Made:
1796 in England
artist:
John Russell

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Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Telescopic study of the Moon, by John Russell RA, 1796. 1 drawing: crayon pastel, on paper; 46x61cm, conserved 2000 and backed to 50x66cm. in protective frame 53x68.5x4cm. Diameter of Moon' s dial 14.5ins/37cm.

Sketch in crayon pastel drawn by John Russell RA in 1796 of the gibbous Moon at last quarter. The view is based on his observations of the Moon made through a telescope. An established portrait painter, John Russell (1745-1806) believed he could produce a more realistic and accurate portrayal of our lunar neighbour. Russell started his observations of the Moon in 1785 using a small refracting telescope fitted with an eyepiece micrometer to accurately measure the lunar features. His lunar sketches were later engraved and published in 1797 along with a Moon globe that was mounted on an elaborate brass stand called 'Selenographia'.

Details

Category:
Art
Object Number:
1922-34
Materials:
crayon pastel and paper
Measurements:
overall (framed): 855 mm x 705 mm x 30 mm,
image: 460 mm x 590 mm
type:
drawing - visual work
taxonomy:
  • visual and verbal communication
credit:
Parker, H.J.