Morland's calculating machine, engraved "Samuel Morland, Inventor, 1666"

Made:
1666-1680 in England
maker:
Samuel Morland
Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Morland's machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Morland's calculating machine, engraved "Samuel Morland, Inventor, 1666"; in leather box

Humphrey Adamson, mathemtical instrument maker active 1668-1676, made the calculating machine invented by Samuel Morland.

Morland’s machine was similar to the slightly earlier one of Blaise Pascal, but less complicated and more reliable. He marketed it to the moneyed elite with little mathematical expertise: ‘these incomparable instruments will show them how to play Addition and Subtraction in Lsd and whole numbers without a pen, ink or help of memory.’ Robert Hooke, writing on arithmetical aids in 1673, was dismissive: ‘The best way for addition and subtraction is by setting down the numbers on paper ... for those kinds of operations in arithmetic an instrument is wholly insignificant and at best will come short of common counters.’

Details

Category:
Mathematics
Object Number:
1905-109
Materials:
bone, brass (copper, zinc alloy), leather, silk and wood (unidentified)
Measurements:
Open: 95 mm x 120 mm x 75 mm, .23 kg
Closed: 50 mm x 120 mm x 150 mm, .23 kg
type:
adding machine (stylus)
credit:
Major-General H.P. Babbage