Piece from the London University Computing Service

Made:
c. 1964
maker:
Ferranti Limited

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Piece from the London University Computing Service Atlas computer, engineer's console, about 1964

Ferranti Atlases were the most powerful computers in the world when first released in

1962. This is the console from the University of London’s machine—the computer itself

occupied two large rooms. This Atlas was part-funded by British Petroleum, which used it to calculate routes for its oil tanker fleet. The problem of finding the shortest route involved great complexity. There are millions of different routes one tanker can take to visit just a handful of different ports.

Details

Category:
Computing & Data Processing
Object Number:
1973-563
Materials:
aluminium (metal), copper (alloy), plastic (unidentified) and steel (metal)
type:
london university computing service atlas
credit:
London University Computing Centre