Snow-type chloroform inhaler

Made:
1848-1870 in London
maker:
Savigny and Company
A625273, Bottle and tubing from Snow's inhaler for chloroform anaesthesia, face mask missing, by Savigny and Co.,

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A625273, Bottle and tubing from Snow's inhaler for chloroform anaesthesia, face mask missing, by Savigny and Co.,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

© The Board of Trustees of the
Science Museum Group

© The Board of Trustees of the
Science Museum Group

© The Board of Trustees of the
Science Museum Group

© The Board of Trustees of the
Science Museum Group

© The Board of Trustees of the
Science Museum Group

© The Board of Trustees of the
Science Museum Group

Bottle and tubing from Snow's inhaler for chloroform anaesthesia, face mask missing, by Savigny and Co., England, 1848-1870

John Snow (1813-58) was the first specialist anaesthetist in Britain. He originally described his inhaler in 1847. The profile of both Snow and anaesthesia received a big boost when Queen Victoria was given chloroform during the birth of her son Leopold in 1853. The anaesthetist on that occasion was John Snow.

In this inhaler, one canister was used for cold water and the other for chloroform. The brass face mask lined with velvet (shown here from a different example) was attached to the end of the flexible tube so the patient could inhale the anaesthetic vapours. The inhaler is shown here with a face mask (A625286).

Details

Category:
Anaesthesiology
Object Number:
A625273
Materials:
bottle, brass, paper, tube, cloth, covered and tube, metal
Measurements:
tubing: 310 mm 45 mm, .34 kg
bottle: 150 mm 67 mm, .66 kg
type:
inhaler
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment