Rendle-type inhaler

Made:
1869-1910 in England
maker:
Unknown

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Rendle's inhaler for alcohol, chloroform and ether mixture anaesthesia, English, 1869-1910

Richard Rendle (1811-1893) invented this particular inhaler to be used with bichloride of methylene in 1867. Inside the flannel a sponge soaked with the anaesthetic was placed inside the cardboard cone and the vapours breathed in by the patient. The inhaler was also adapted to be used with a mixture of alcohol, ether and chloroform.

Rendle’s design was criticised as there was no clear way to regulate the dosage of anaesthetic and it was difficult to clean. Nevertheless, the inhaler was available until 1915.

Details

Category:
Anaesthesiology
Object Number:
A625372
Materials:
flannel, removable lining and leather, covered
type:
inhaler
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment