Copy of the Squire-type ether inhaler first used in 1846

Made:
Unknown in Europe
maker:
Peter Squire
Copy of the Squire-type ether inhaler first used in 1846 (inhaler)

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Copy of the Squire type of ether inhaler used by Liston in 1846

The original Squire-type ether inhaler was used by Robert Liston (1794-1847) on 21 December 1846 to perform the first operation in England under anaesthetic, at University College Hospital London. He amputated a leg from Frederick Churchill, a chauffeur. After surgery was completed, the patient reported that he was unaware that the operation had even taken place.

Vapours from ether-soaked sponges in the top of the inhaler collect in the chamber at the bottom. The vapours are inhaled by the patient through the metal face mask. The device is named after Peter Squire, a pharmacist commissioned by Liston to make the inhaler.

Details

Category:
Anaesthesiology
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A600324
Materials:
rubber, glass, sponge, plastic, metal, wood and brass
Measurements:
overall: 383 mm x 335 mm 230 mm, 1.83kg
overall (as displayed): 380 mm x 325 mm x 252 mm,
type:
inhaler