Brass anatomical syringe

Made:
1810-1872
maker:
Savigny and Company
Anatomical syringe set in case, first half 19th century, by Savigny and Co.,  60 & 61 St James St., London, English.

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Anatomical syringe set in case, first half 19th century, by Savigny and Co., 60 & 61 St James St., London, English.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Brass anatomical syringe from cased set, by Savigny & Co., London, England, 1801-1850

Anatomical syringe sets were used to inject wax and other substances into body parts to preserve their structure. The resulting anatomical preparations were useful teaching aids in an age when there was a lack of bodies available for dissection.

Made by Savigny & Co, this syringe can hold 6 fluid ounces (16 ml) of wax. The syringe comes with eight different attachments, possibly for different areas of the body. Wax injection was perfected by, among others, Frederik Ruysch (1638-1731), a Dutch anatomist who was also known for his fantastical and often grotesque arrangements of anatomical specimens.

Details

Category:
Anatomy & Pathology
Object Number:
A61279 Pt1
type:
syringes anatomy (instruments) and anatomy (instruments) and syringes
credit:
Loan, Wellcome Trust