Embalming syringe set, London, England, 1790-1820

Made:
1790-1845 in Southwark

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Embalming syringe set, made by Laundy, St.Thomas's St., Southwark, London, English, 1790-1820

The embalming set consists of two brass syringes and accompanying accessories. It sits in a purple velvet lined wooden box. It was made between 1790 and 1820 by London-based surgical instrument makers, Laundy. Embalming syringes preserved the body by injecting chemicals such as arsenic or zinc chloride, normally via the arteries. This delayed inevitable decomposition of the body rather than halting it.

At this time, embalming preserved cadavers (bodies) for anatomical teaching. Today, embalming in some religious traditions preserves the body so it remains presentable during the funeral service.

Details

Category:
Anatomy & Pathology
Object Number:
A680863
Materials:
brass, case, velvet, lining and case, wood
Measurements:
overall (closed): 101 mm x 439 mm x 174 mm, 4.76 kg
overall (open): 252 mm x 439 mm x 217 mm, 4.76 kg
type:
embalming syringe set
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • medical instrument
  • syringe