Scintillation detector, United States, 1970-1979

Made:
1970-1979 in United States and United Kingdom
maker:
Packard BioScience

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

446 Armac Scintillation Detector, made by Packard in the 1970s, used at St. Mary's hospital for clinical diagnosis employing radioisotopes in blood clearance studies to make measurements from a body part (usually an arm) rather than doing a whole body count.

Low-level radioactive isotopes can be introduced to a patient’s body. This is to monitor or diagnose some medical conditions. The isotopes are not harmful, but they can reveal problems with the organs or blood vessels, or reveal the extent of internal injuries. A gamma X-ray camera tracks the radiation. The camera works by converting the radiation into light through a layer of crystal. This machine then interprets and produces the results in the form of an image of the inside of the body.

Later models can produce a moving image rather than a sequence. This lets doctors see the movement of organs in real-time.

Details

Category:
Clinical Diagnosis
Object Number:
2004-29
Materials:
metal and plastic
type:
scintillation detector
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • measuring device - instrument
  • radiation detector
  • scintillation counter
credit:
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital